Two-Stage Weaning Video

An excellent video by Dr. Joe Stookey (Twitter @StookeyJoe), animal behaviour professor of the Western College of Veterinary Medicine, describing the results of recent research into the two-stage weaning system and how it can benefit calf health and welfare at weaning time. Used in conjunction with his novel and efficient way of sorting and separating cow/calf pairs, this new method of weaning could mean less stress and disease during transport and arrival at the feedlot and an increase in weight gain and productivity.  See the amazing results for...

Cattle Case: Jejunal Hemorrhage Syndrome

Crystal Riczu, ,  March 2013   HISTORY Last year, a 3 year old Angus bull (Bull 1) was presented with anorexia, weight loss, and dark tarry feces. A comprehensive diagnostic work came back inconclusive. The bull was treated with gastroprotectants, seemed to improve over the next month, but then was found dead with no significant post mortem (autopsy) findings. Two weeks ago, Bull 2 (a 2 year old Angus bull) also presented with anorexia, weight loss, and dark hemorrhagic diarrhea at the same time that Bull 3 (a 2 year old Angus bull) who had been losing weight over the winter, seemed to “not be doing right”. Over the next week the...

Redwater Disease: Bacillary Hemoglobinuria

Crystal Riczu, , March 2013 Bacillary hemoglobinuria, also known as redwater disease, is an acute, infectious, toxic disease that primarily affects young cattle on pasture (but may also affect sheep).  It is caused by the bacteria Clostridium haemolyticum which is a soil borne bacterium that can survive a long time in contaminated soil or in bones of infected carcasses.  The bacteria spores are ingested and are naturally found in the rumen and liver of healthy cattle.  It is not until there is local liver damage and necrosis (usually caused by a migrating liver fluke infection or much less commonly due to a high nitrate diet) that the...

Management of Bovine Neonatal Diarrhea

Crystal Riczu: , March 2013 Bovine neonatal diarrhea (scours) is the increased frequency, quantity, and liquid content of feces with or without blood or mucous. It is an important cause of death in milk fed calves that has huge financial implications for producers in terms of increased labour, veterinary/drug bills, and reduced lifetime production of that animal. CAUSES The cause of calf diarrhea is often multifactorial, with  more than one agent involved, including: viruses (rotavirus, coronavirus, BVDV), bacteria (E-coli, salmonella), parasites (coccidian, cryptosporidium), nutritional stress (overfeeding, irregular feeding, changing milk...

VVV Episode 7: The "Almost" Castration

The other day we were called out to perform a routine castration on a miniature horse… or so we thought. We performed a physical exam on the little stud and determined that he was good to go ahead with the surgery.  We administered his pre-anesthetic drugs to make him a bit sleepy, and proceeded to palpate the inguinal region. What we found there was not quite what we expected: there was only one testicle in the scrotum. This little mini is a cryptorchid. Cryptorchids are intact males with one or both testicles absent from the scrotum. Cryptorchids are still producing the same amount of testosterone as a normal intact male, but they...

Calf Case: Femoral Nerve Injury

Monica Kovacs: ,  March 2013 | Edited by Jennifer Enzie and Cody Creelman   Case Presentation: In mid-March we received a call from a producer at a commercial cross cow-calf operation asking us to check out a 3 week old calf. When we arrived, the calf was lying down and sleeping comfortably. When prompted to stand, he got up and was bright and alert, however, he only bore weight on his left hind leg. From taking a thorough history, we learned that this calf was fairly large at birth and so his dam, being a small heifer, had trouble giving birth (dystocia).  He was a hard pull because he was “hiplocked” for a period of time....